Recruiters deal with a lot of candidates and a lot of jobs. Some of those candidates stand out from the crowd and demonstrate that they would make a good hire before they have even had an interview. Put yourself in our shoes and think about what you might do if you were working with multiple candidates; who are the people you are most likely to go the extra mile for? From my perspective there are things that candidates can do to put themselves near the top of my list; here are the key considerations.

1. Meet face to face

Don’t think of a face to face registration as a chore or an inconvenience, and don’t worry that you need to impress as with an interview. It’s not simply about filling in forms and scanning passports but about building a relationship with the person who will be representing you in the market. If we know who we are recommending to a client we can get you that interview for your ideal role, one which you may not get on the strength of your CV alone.

We can only use our powers of persuasion to full effect if we know what, or more accurately who, we’re recommending and why. In addition, if we were to make a poor recommendation to a client we risk damaging our relationship with that business. We are much less likely to make a strong recommendation of someone we don’t know and if we haven’t met, you may miss out to someone who had that face to face registration.

2. Be open and honest

We don’t want to waste anyone’s time. Not yours, not ours and not our clients. The relationship between a candidate and recruiter is a two way street and it requires a certain level of trust, openness and reliability to succeed. If you are not truly interested in a job let us know so we can move onto new roles; be honest about why so we can get it right next time. On the other side if there is a job that you are really excited about we should know; businesses want to hire people who are excited to work for them and if we don’t know then they won’t either.

3. Look beyond the job description

This sounds obvious but far too many candidates judge, and dismiss, roles based on a simple job spec. Imagine if businesses only judged you on your CV and never took the time to meet you; there is more to you that what’s on that piece of paper. This works both ways and many jobs are much more that they might appear based on a short spec.

If you go on to reject a second interview then you can be confident in the fact that you have made an informed decision. I’m not suggesting that you say yes to everything that comes your way, just recommending that you keep an open mind and avoid saying ‘no’ too early. If nothing else, interviewing will help you to refine your search and improve your interview technique.

4. Try being an exclusive candidate

The first few weeks of a job search can be a busy time and there is nothing worse than wasting your time talking with ten different recruiters, answering the same questions over and over. Try sticking with a single recruiter on an exclusive basis, at least for the first few weeks. That way you can build a real understanding and narrow your search onto jobs which truly suit you.

5. Pick up the phone

Avoid communicating purely via email. A quick chat on your lunch can make the difference between getting and missing out on an interview. Recruitment can be a fast moving business and email does not ensure that you have your finger on the pulse. This is even more important if you haven’t had the chance to meet your recruiter.

6. Prepare for interviews

We don’t expect you to get offered every job you interview for. However if we get good feedback, and our client reports that you were well prepared, you will be at the top of our list for the next role. Candidates who are ill prepared, late, or poorly presented are not likely to be out forward for future interviews. Put 100% effort into every interview, even if it’s not for your first choice role at the time.

7. Communicate

Reply to messages, even if it’s just to say that you’ve found a new role. When candidates re-register in a busy market, recruiters remember those that were reliable and responsive. A quick and efficient response also gives us an insight into your decision making abilities and how efficient and organised you are. This can influence the type and volume of roles we approach you with.

A successful job hunt should be a partnership between you and your recruiter. If you are easy to work with, responsive and well prepared you make your recruiter’s job easier and will improve your chances of getting a great job. Those candidates who stand out are the ones a recruiter is most likely to go the extra mile for.

If you would like to speak to a consultant about job opportunities, please contact Page Personnel here

Summary

There are a few key considerations when dealing with a recruiter. If you want to put yourself near the top of the list, here’s what to do:

  1. Meet face to face
  2. Be open and honest
  3. Look beyond the job description
  4. Try being an exclusive candidate
  5. Pick up the phone
  6. Prepare for interviews
  7. Communicate 
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