Even the most seasoned or confident person can get flustered and mess up their job interview. It’s a nerve-wracking experience where multiple things can instantly undo us.

Follow our updated checklist to ensure you’re aware of the factors that you can control so that you give yourself the best chance to have a successful interview.

With preparation in advance, you can avoid making one or more of these 15 common interview mistakes.

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1. Going in without any research

You might have all the skills to do the job, but do you know how the company operates? Check the ‘About Us’ link on the company website and read their mission statement – memorise their values and find opportunities to mention this in the interview. And don’t stop there. Use Google to see when they are mentioned or if they make any company announcements to give you a better understanding of the type of business they are.

It also doesn’t hurt to find out about their competition and major players in the market. That way, you can ask smart questions in the interview such as how they see the business differentiating itself from its peers and competitors.

Further, try to research the hiring manager or recruiter. You may be able to find some common interests or ask an initial question about their experience that interests you – this plays well to establishing rapport at the very start of your interview.

2. Turning up late

Unless you have an emergency or very good reason for running late and have called ahead to notify or reschedule, turning up late for a job interview will not sit well with an employer, hiring manager or recruiter.

Plan ahead in terms of your travel arrangements on the day – does your train line experience delays from time to time? It might be worth catching one or two trains earlier than what you were planning to take, giving you plenty of time to arrive and focus on final preparation while you wait to be called in.

Alternatively, in this age of virtual job interviews, ensure you test your technology and the program that will be used to conduct the online call. You don’t want to turn up late because you didn’t realise the platform takes five minutes to download and launch.

3. Dressing inappropriately

While smart-casual might be becoming more of a trend, professional attire is still considered the most appropriate business etiquette for interviews.

It’s all about first impressions.

Read our checklist on what to wear to a job interview and other considerations.

4. Fidgeting with your mobile phone and other distractions

Our mobile phones have pretty much become an extension of us – not just for phone calls and texts anymore – so it can be difficult to put away. Once you have arrived at your interview location, it’s time to lock your phone (ensure it’s on silent and not on vibrate) and place it either in your bag or pocket. There is no reason for you to take your phone out during the interview so keep it out of sight.

In addition to being distracted by your phone, you might also overlook things like: fidgeting with your hair, chewing on gum, chewing on nails, constantly sniffing or coughing (you should not be attending an interview if you are unwell), or tapping your shoes.

5. Poor body language

Feeling disinterested will result in you also looking disinterested. Think about how you come across if your arms are crossed, either while you’re waiting or during the interview. Eye contact, good posture, a cheerful demeanour and firm handshake will get you a long way in an interview. After all, this is what you’ll be bringing to the company, if successful.

RELATED: How to make a memorable first impression

6. Unclear answers and rambling

Take a few seconds to think about the interview question before responding. Ensure you don’t go off on tangents or end abruptly without rounding out your answer back to what was asked. Also, avoid mumbling or speaking too fast. The interviewer shouldn’t have to ask you to repeat an answer or strain to hear what you’re saying. If need be, practise a few questions with a friend or into a recording app on your phone to hear how you really sound.

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7. Speaking negatively about current or past employers

Never complain about your current or former employers. No matter how ineffectual or bad the situation was, badmouthing will not reflect well on you.

What kind of behaviour can put a hiring manager off? Watch the video below for five common interview mistakes that can put an interviewer off-side and seriously hurt your chances of success for a new job.

8. Having zero questions to ask

Employers want to gauge where your interest level is at, so you should prepare some questions ahead of time – it can be about the specifics of the role, something about the company you learned through research or even the current team you’ll be working with, if successful. It doesn’t hurt to write or print these questions out to take them with you to the interview, so you don’t forget to ask.

You’ll make a great first impression by showing an added level of engagement through the questions you ask. Equally, the answers may help you better understand the role and whether it’s the right fit for you. So don’t pass up this opportunity.

RELATED: Asking the right questions in an interview

9. Lying on your CV and at the interview

Be honest from the start to the end of the interview. Anything written on your CV could be discussed at an interview so any fabrications about your work or education record will damage your chances. If working with a recruiter, it will be noted in your file and you will not be offered any more roles or opportunities through that agency.

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10. Getting too personal

While friendliness and humour never hurts at a job interview, you need to avoid being too casual. Remember, your interviewer could become your manager (or your recruiter will be passing on their feedback to your potential future employer) so behave in a friendly and respectful manner, and always keep it professional.

11. Sitting down before being invited or trying to run the meeting

It’s common courtesy to wait until you’re shown a seat to sit down. In this scenario, the hiring manager or recruiter will take the lead and direct the interview so follow their instructions from the moment you shake their hand.

Once you’re seated, avoid slouching in your chair or putting your feet anywhere but firmly on the ground.

At the same time, do not try to control or run the meeting. The hiring manager or recruiter will have certain points they need to get through with you within that period of time.

12. Discussing money or time off

Unless an offer is put on the table or they have raised remuneration at the interview, it’s not recommended that you discuss money or request annual leave for an upcoming holiday. This is because the impression you are giving is that you’re more fixated on pay and travel rather than the job itself.

It’s best to leave this for later interview rounds so that you impress the hiring manager or recruiter of your capabilities and suitability for the role first. Most employers are understanding when it comes to hiring new staff, knowing that they will have salary expectations or have already booked a holiday or requested time off at their current role.

Equally, it’s important to make a judgement call in being transparent. For example, if you know the role will commence in June and you’re required to attend a conference, you should probably mention that you will be interstate or unavailable due to a wedding, for example. Or if there was no salary listed in the job advertisement and you were advised it will be given at the interview, enquire then and there.

13. Swearing and using offensive language or gestures

This might seem like a no-brainer but let’s face it, most of us are used to throwing in a swear word into our conversations with friends and these days we don’t even realise. It’s incredibly important to keep reminding yourself that the job interview is a formal and professional setting. Thinking about what you’re going to say or just taking an extra moment before you speak will slow your brain down and should help decrease the chances of an accidental swear.

14. No thank you or follow-up

Regardless of how you went, first and foremost, it’s courteous to email the person who interviewed you (or the recruiter) within a few hours of finishing your first interview. Not only is it good manners but it also keeps you front of mind.

In addition, this is your chance to reiterate your interest in the role. You’ll stand out more if you mention one or two key discussion points from the interview, as it demonstrates your engagement with what was touched on.

Otherwise, if you’ve decided it’s not for you, ask them to get in touch when a similar or more suitable role comes up.

RELATED: How to write a follow-up email

15. Not showing up

The practice of “ghosting” isn’t just for those dating. It’s still a common occurrence for candidates not to show up to an interview after a change of mind, or other reasons. It’s incredibly important to contact the hiring manager or recruiter ahead of time so that the interview can be cancelled and no one wastes their time. In addition to being apologetic, clearly state why you no longer want to pursue the role.

If you decide not to show up on the day of the interview, it will be noted that you were a no-show. Essentially, you’ve now hurt your chances to be considered for any roles with that company, or if you used a recruiter, it’s highly unlikely you will be put forward for any of their upcoming roles for the many clients and companies they hire for.

There may be some leeway for more serious reasons, such as accidents or family emergencies, so at your earliest convenience, do let the hiring manager or your recruiter know – they will be understanding and can guide you on the next steps.

Ready to apply for a new role? Check out our current opportunities here, or get in touch with a specialist Page Personnel recruitment consultant today.

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